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Bark Dugout, 351 NE 18th

351 NE 18th Avenue
Portland, OR 97232, US (map)

Future events happening here

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Past events that happened here

  • Thursday
    Jan 11 2018
    Radicle Activist Training: Campaign Toolbox

    Bark's successes in protecting Mt. Hood forests and rivers are only possible because of our volunteer organizers, educators, and activists. This Radicle training focuses on the tools of advocacy, activism, and public engagement.

    Portlanders old and new are incredibly fortunate to live in a region where environmental advocacy and grassroots activism have both deep cultural roots and a legacy of some of the most important political and legal victories in the country. You don't need to go far at all in this town to find passionate and experienced organizers and activists, and this community is growing! This training aims to connect aspiring leaders with mentors and to teach you some basics of community organizing such as (event planning and social media tips). Join us to learn more about which tools we use to organize here in Portland and win in our efforts to protect Mt. Hood forests. Our success lies in using a variety of essential tools including legal action, political activism, cultural education, and community organizing to stop a destructive project or advocate for clean water and healthy ecosystems on public lands.

    Bark has spent 15 years honing these tactics, which are all the more effective when there are more people out there taking a stand! This training will outline the tools we use, how they work together, and discuss evolving organizing tactics. The workshop will be led by Courtney Rae, Bark's Community Organizer. Courtney has been working on environmental, political and social campaigns for 10 years.

    Suggested Pre-requisite: Forest Policy Crash Course, Volunteer orientation or previous experience volunteering for Bark. All are welcome.

    This event is part of Bark's Radicle Training Program which empowers individuals to learn valuable skills in forest ecology, public lands advocacy and community organizing. Visit www.bark-out.org to learn more about Radicle.

    Website
  • Thursday
    Nov 2 2017
    Intro to Forest Policy: Forest Fire Edition
    • How has history created "public lands" and how has "ownership" changed over the last century?
    • Which laws protect the land and which accommodate destructive commercial activity?
    • Who makes land management decisions about forest fire and what are their goals?

    How can we influence the management if we, the public, don’t like it?

    This training, facilitated by Bark's staff attorney, Brenna Bell, will answer all these questions, and more, as we learn about how and why the Forest Service and BLM (mis)manage our public lands?

    http://bark-out.org/content/rad%E2%97%A6i%E2%97%A6cle-activist-training

    Website
  • Monday
    Aug 14 2017
    August Ecology Club: Intro to Forest Ecology

    Bark Dugout, 351 NE 18th

    Dr. Trygve Steen, local forest ecologist, will give a talk about the fascinating, intricate of the web of life in our backyard forests! While this class will be appropriate for beginners, Dr. Steen’s presentation is sure to engage seasoned forest ecologists as well.

    Join us to talk about what makes a Pacific Northwest forest unique: fire, climate, and the mesmerizing stages of forest succession in a Westside forest. Dr. Steen is also renowned photographer of forest ecosystems, and this presentation features his distinctive images of plants, animals and all manner of life in the forest. Dr. Steen has taught forest ecology for decades, including field classes at the Opal Creek Ancient Forest Center and Portland State University.

    At the close of the meeting we will leave time open to further explore the topics of the evening, delve deeper into Bark's work to protect Mt Hood and browse the Bark library. Our library is more than a physical space; it is also intangible, represented by volunteers who are knowledgeable and accessible for people interested in learning more about our work, ecology, public lands management and advocacy. Come peruse our newly acquired selection of resources on everything from hiking to climate justice, and learn about what you can do to protect Mt. Hood National Forest!

    Call us at 503-331-0374 or email michael@bark-out.org

    • Where: Bark office: 351 NE 18th Ave Portland, OR 97232 (next to the Circuit Climbing Gym).
    • When: 6:30-8:30pm every second Monday.

    Bark is awesome! Bark is the resource for community action to protect Mt. Hood National Forest and surrounding federal lands. We prioritize grassroots organizing and believe in the power of an engaged public. We recognize that the forest should thrive not just to provide resources for the human community, but also for the inherent value of nature itself. We maintain an organizational culture that is transparent, inclusive and cooperative, where volunteers, staff and board work together to realize the vision of Bark.

    What does BARK stand for? Bark’s name originates from the barker, who stands before the public and uses persistent outcry to call attention. We are a group of barkers, ensuring that the public hears about all events, good and bad, occurring in the Mt. Hood National Forest.

    Website
  • Monday
    Aug 7 2017
    Bark Base Camp Volunteer Planning Meeting

    Volunteer to support Bark's Base Camp! Attend this planning meeting on Monday, August 7th from 6-8pm at the Bark Dugout: 351 NE 18th Ave in Portland.

    All are invited to this meeting who are interested in helping plan our Base Camp, which will be out in the forest August 24th – September 7thin the Crystal Clear Timber Sale.

    At this meeting, we’ll share information and answer questions about the camp. We will also provide a list of roles which we’ll be trying to fill relating to camp outreach, logistics, and donations. This is a great way to plug into Bark's work this summer and get involved. Help us make this camp the best one ever!


    Bark is awesome! Bark is the resource for community action to protect Mt. Hood National Forest and surrounding federal lands. We prioritize grassroots organizing and believe in the power of an engaged public. We recognize that the forest should thrive not just to provide resources for the human community, but also for the inherent value of nature itself. We maintain an organizational culture that is transparent, inclusive and cooperative, where volunteers, staff and board work together to realize the vision of Bark.

    What does BARK stand for? Bark’s name originates from the barker, who stands before the public and uses persistent outcry to call attention. We are a group of barkers, ensuring that the public hears about all events, good and bad, occurring in the Mt. Hood National Forest.

    Website