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Paragon Arts Gallery, 815 N Killingsworth

815 N Killingsworth Street
Portland, OR 97217, US (map)
(971) 722-5326

Tags

nopo, pcc

Future events happening here

  • - No events -

Past events that happened here

  • Saturday
    Dec 9 2017
    Invisible Labor (Working Makes Me Important)

    Receive a painting, get a haircut, obtain language classes and engage in a conversation about Art and Labor.

    Participatory presentation by José de Jesús González, Eligio Mendoza, Eric Ssonko and Fernando Patterson from the MLK Worker Center, and Patricia Vázquez. Artwork produced through the project Working Makes Me Important on exhibition and for sale.

    Funded by a Creative Heights Grant from the Oregon Community Foundation.

    Website
  • Saturday
    Oct 14 2017
    Open Dialogue w/The Black School

    Imagining and Administering Black Radical Education: Open Dialogue w/ The Black School

    Saturday, October 14, 3-4:30

    Join us for an open forum discussion with The Black School co-administers Joseph Cuillier and Shani Peters. Based in New York City, The Black School is an experimental art school that uses a socially engaged proactive art practice and Black history to educate Black/PoC students and allies on how to become radical agents of social and political change. In their visit to This is a Black Spatial Imaginary, Cuillier and Peters will share an overview of The Black School’s work to date and offer context to their collaborative work through discussion of their individual practices. The later half of the talk will be an open model inviting Portland based artists, educators, and community members to participate in a dialogue around the needs of student’s and educators alike as they relate to art and blackness in general, and to the histories of Black radical education and aesthetics in particular.

    Website
  • Friday
    Oct 13 2017
    Closing Reception: This is a Black Spatial Imaginary

    Join us for the closing reception of This is a Black Spatial Imaginary, with food, music, print, and video.

    afterpartly at CAKE "your all inclusing QTPOC hip hop night", across the street from Paragon Gallery at the Killingsworth Dynasty https://www.facebook.com/cakepartyla/

    curated by bart fitzgerald w/URe:AD Press

    ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

    About:

    bart fitzgerald’s work explores black sociality, religion and queerness through a lens of liberation theology as base ideology for radical living. they make work as an visual artist, writer, lecturer and curator of vibrant life for black folks in Portland, OR.

    URe:AD Press stands for “United Re:Public of the African Diaspora.” URe:AD Press is grounded in shared inquiry and affinity for the African Diaspora, self-determination, audiovisual media, and DIY mobile printmaking strategies. URe:AD produces free transmedia events emphasizing a local group’s connection to a broader and deeper diasporic community across continents and history.

    This Is A Black Spatial Imaginary considers the movement and fixity of Black communities, by activating past, present and future spaces for Black life. Moving from NW to NE Portland (as Black Portlanders did), the work starts near Union Station at PNCA’s Center for Contemporary Art and Culture, crosses the Broadway Bridge, activates key sites, and ends on the eastside at PCC’s Paragon Gallery, with over 40 of Black artists and scholars coming together to showcase work and share ideas. In shifting through historical and contemporary Black geographies, the work provides clues to understanding how Black possibilities live and breathe. The project grounds itself in collaborative work that span local and global Black geographic imaginaries, bringing both analytics and poetics to fields of practice.

    Website
  • In Conversation: Photos by Miá Charnelle

    Join us for an evening of conversation and photography with Miá Charnelle. Miá Charnelle is a Queer and gender fluid creative and fashion stylist from Portland, OR. Miá has been taking photos on 35mm film with disposable cameras for the past 4 years—candid shots of family, friends, and portraits and places that contain personal narratives of black joy, love, and loss. We’ll get a rare glimpse into this work and get to engage in conversation with Miá about this part of their creative practice.

    This event is TQPOC centered.

    Find them at www.miacharnelle.com and ig: @miacharnellevisuals


    This is a Black Spatial Imaginary
    Art
    This Is A Black Spatial Imaginary considers the movement and fixity of Black communities, by activating past, present and future spaces for Black life.

    Website
  • Monday
    Oct 9 2017
    Screening: Welcome II the Terror Dome

    Join us for an evening of VHS, snacks, and a discussion with artist ariella tai. Free and open to the public.

    This screening is part of the public programming for This is a Black Spatial Imaginary.

    More about the film: Welcome II the Terrordome

    Directed by Ngozi Onwurah/1993/90m

    Ngozi Onwurah’s dystopian science fiction film debut begins with a re-imagining of Ibo Landing set in 1652. A kidnapped Ibo family is brought to the shores of the Carolinas, refuses enslavement and calmly walks back into the sea. From here, the film travels to a near future where all black people are forced to live in a heavily surveilled, overcrowded, impoverished ghetto called Terrordome. Anjela fights to protect her family and young children from gang, police and white vigilante violence. Her brother, Spike, struggles to find safety for himself and his pregnant white girlfriend.

    The first film directed by a black woman to obtain a theatrical release in the UK, Welcome II the Terrordome is heavily stylized and righteously angry. Onwurah viscerally explores the complex iterations of anti-black violence and grimly celebrates a world where we resist, refuse and take revenge.

    trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7w2eYw7nWNY


    This is a Black Spatial Imaginary
    Art
    This Is A Black Spatial Imaginary considers the movement and fixity of Black communities, by activating past, present and future spaces for Black life.

    Website
  • Saturday
    Oct 7 2017
    Moving through Darkness : This is a Black Spatial Imaginary

    movement | dance | performance
    from Intisar Abioto, Akela Auer, and Oluyinka Akinjiola.

    Fresh work you won't want to miss.
    Light refreshments will be served.

    More about this exhibition on our Favebook page "This is a Black Spatial Imaginary."


    This is a Black Spatial Imaginary
    Art
    This Is A Black Spatial Imaginary considers the movement and fixity of Black communities, by activating past, present and future spaces for Black life.

    Website
  • Friday
    Sep 22 2017
    Birthright AFRICA: a conversation
    free

    Join us at the Paragon on 9/22, 3pm for a conversation with Ashlesha Alexandra Johnson, the Founding Fellow and Program Director for Birthright AFRICA, a foundation which provides youths and young adults of African descent the opportunity to explore their cultural roots and legacy of innovation by providing free travel to Africa, to bridge the gap between African diaspora with African mainland.

    birthrightafrica.org

    This talk is part of the public programming for This is a Black Spatial Imaginary.


    Ashlesha Johnson serves as the Creative Director and Program Director for Birthright AFRICA where she ensures effective operations of experiential travel and project-based learning opportunities for Fellows and Scholars. Ashley holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Columbia College Chicago after transitioning from The University of Chicago where she briefly studied Anthropology.

    As a native of Chicago, Ashley was prepared in her youth to serve her role as a “woman for others” through her Jesuit education. She spent those years volunteering in a local soup kitchen and a local battered women’s home in her largely underserved, African-American neighborhood. The daily juxtaposition of these two environments and the realities of her service background had a profound impact and impassioned Ashley to engage her skills in public service. Upon graduating from Columbia College Chicago in 2007, Ashley taught a Garment and Textile course at the Anthony Overton Academy, which at the time was Chicago’s most underfunded grammar school and in the poorest neighborhood. At the Academy, Ashley was enlightened to the patterns and pathos of poor Black families and recognized not only the “school-to-prison pipeline” but the dearth of services provided to African American youth and young adults. After a year of service, Ashley moved to Mexico City where she re-engaged in textile arts working in an atelier and showroom designing garments. In 2012, Ashley continued her Fashion career moving to NYC and where she worked as an independent designer and consultant for up various brands and celebrity clients. She currently lives in Accra, Ghana where she is a startup entrepreneur in addition to serving the Birthright AFRICA program.


    This is a Black Spatial Imaginary
    Art
    This Is A Black Spatial Imaginary considers the movement and fixity of Black communities, by activating past, present and future spaces for Black life.

    Website
  • Sunday
    Sep 3 2017
    This is a Black Spatial Imaginary, two performances and whatnot

    keyon gaskin:

    • this is a performance
    • this is for you
    • you are a community
    • you are my material
    • this is a prison
    • leave when you want

    sidony o'neal:

    • no title

    1st event for "This is a Black Spatial Imaginary" @ Paragon Gallery. Two performances. there will be snacks and whatnot.

    cover charge for non-black people, artists split the proceeds.

    about exhibition and project:

    This is a Black Spatial Imaginary brings together installation, video, print media, performance, and public intervention, exploring new forms of practice at the intersection of art,collaboration, historical record, urban planning, collaboration and creative exchange.

    This Is A Black Spatial Imaginary considers the movement and fixity of Black communities, by activating past, present and future spaces for Black life. Moving from NW to NE Portland (as Black Portlanders did), the work starts near Union Station at PNCA’s Center for Contemporary Art and Culture, crosses the Broadway Bridge, activates key sites, and ends on the eastside at PCC’s Paragon Gallery, with over 40 of Black artists and scholars coming together to showcase work and share ideas. In shifting through historical and contemporary Black geographies, the work provides clues to understanding how Black possibilities live and breathe. The project grounds itself in collaborative work that span local and global Black geographic imaginaries, bringing both analytics and poetics to fields of practice.


    This is a Black Spatial Imaginary considers the movement and fixity of Black communities, by activating past, present and future spaces for Black life.

    Website
  • Friday
    Aug 18 2017
    Portland Propaganda Party - Eclipse Edition
    free

    Propaganda Party- Community Defense: Eclipse Edition

    Propaganda Parties are events where artists and organizers gather to hang out and distribute free material (posters, prints, stickers, flyers, banners, anything), to socialize and to imagine better ways to link art and movements. Live screenprinting of slogans, images, graphics and designs reflecting political and social themes is part of the party too. The third Portland Propaganda Party will take place in the Paragon Gallery at PCC Cascade Campus, 815 North Killingsworth, from 5-9 pm on Friday August 18th.

    The theme of this event is Community Defense. In the aftermath of the violence and alienation of the past several months, we want to create a context where people can consider what it means to defend communities. Tell your friends, your colleagues and your comrades to come hang out, pick up some art, and help us figure out how to use art to help movements do the work that needs to be done.

    These events are put together by a group of Portland artists and organizers who work in a variety of movements, and using a variety of tactics. We have in common a belief that visual art can shift consciousness and bring people together, and we want to use that power to uplift communities and help them feel strong enough to defend themselves in the current climate.

    Any questions? Contact Roger at toosphexy@gmail.com or Esther at estherpdx@gmail.com

    Website
  • Thursday
    May 25 2017
    "Celilo Fishermen" - Shadow Puppets Illustrating Ed Edmo's Poem

    Using shadow puppets and historical images from the Upper Columbia River's fishing heritage, Virginia Marting and Moe Bowstern illustrate Ed Edmo's poem 'Celilo Fishermen.' The collaboration is a haunting elegy for a 15,000 year way of life brought to an end by the construction of the Dalles dam and the subsequent flooding of Celilo Falls. This performance is part of the Making Change Series of Events and Workshops at Paragon Gallery, happening between May 16th and May 27th.

    This prformance is free and we'll be accepting donations. Doors open 7:30 pm and performance will start at 8 pm (It's a short piece so please be on time so you don't miss it! <3 )

    Moe and Virginia will be teaching a workshop about shadow puppets earlier that day at the gallery. For more information about it and to sign up (require) you can go to www.playingwithlightandshadows.eventbrite.com

    To see the schedule for Making Change go to www.pcc.edu/about/galleries/cascade

    Moe Bowstern and Virginia Marting are part of Paper Eclipse Puppet Company and have been collaborating with each other since 2005. You can learn more about their work checking their websites. www.moebowstern.com www.virginiamarting.com www.papereclipse.com

    Website